The Difficulties of Health Care Reform

Health care reform in the U.S. is difficult because we have assembled the most complicated, convoluted, inefficient, un-systemic health care “non-system” of the industrialized nations. The two biggest cost drivers are: the American lifestyle of too much food and not enough exercise, and the payer “system”. Changing these two factors are “extremely difficult” and “difficult”.

Health care reform in the U.S. is difficult because the elected officials who are to change or reform the non-system seldom get the opportunity to truly learn and understand the vagaries of Medicaid, Medicare, SCHIP, the Veterans Admin health system, ERISA, federal regulations, state regulations, and more. All Americans pay into these programs via taxes, but only poor, old, kids, & vets receive benefits. No other country has different programs for poor, old, kids, vets. Instead, every other industrialized nation collects taxes from their citizens but then guarantees a minimum benefit for every citizen regardless of age or wealth. Americas segregated health benefit “system” makes us unique and costs substantially more while delivering less.

Health care reform in the U.S. is difficult because there are so many lobbyists defending every station of the status quo. Many organizations, corporations, and individuals make money from the “system” the way it is. Hospitals, Doctors, Dentists, HMOs, pharmaceutical companies, health insurance companies, trial attorneys, etc., all will oppose some aspect of reform. They oppose any reform which might reduce their revenue or their ability to control who gets what.

Senator Chris Steineger represents the 6th district of Kansas, which includes portions of Kansas City and Edwardsville. Currently in his fourth term, Senator Steineger is the ranking member of the Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee and also sits on: the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules and Regulations; the Committee on Assessment and Taxation; the Committee on Education; the Joint Committee on Information Technology; and the Joint Committee on Legislative Post Audit.

Health Reform

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